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Bitcoins

Meanwhile, other major currencies such as Ethereum (ETH), EOS, tezos (XTZ), exceeding BTC, rose 5% to 11%.

When BTC first surpassed $ 10,000 for the first time this year, analysts speculated that even bigger profits might be the No. 1 digital asset, however, today BTC dropped to $ 9,800.
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Subsequently, Willy Woo, a popular analyst for Bilcoin, said Breaking Bin’s author was “a real deal”, given that “substantive investment activity is supportive.”

Meanwhile, the top ten altcoins out of the top 100 are green against BTC today.

As announced today, the “healthy distribution” of the market is upon us, as a result of the eventual decline of BTC dominance and the decline in Altcoin quality, according to rating agency and Tokening data.

In related news, the Chicago Mercantile Stock Exchange (CME Group), the major financial derivatives market, said today that January 2020 was the second best month in Bitcoin futures since its 2017 launch, averaging 10,800 contracts, 69% larger than its average daily volume in 2019 as Yes, they say, new options on Bitcoin futures are on the rise. Since launch, 466 options contracts (2,300 Bitcoin equivalent) have traded – nearly 40% as blocks, showing signs of institutional interest, CME said. He also recorded an average monthly record of 56 large open interest holders (entities holding 25+ contracts).

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Cheap Flights to San Jose – Learn About the SJC Airport, Airlines, & Savings Opportunities

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Have you been searching the internet for cheap flights to San Jose, CA? It’s a popular city that has a large international airport (SJC). San Jose is a hot spot for business travelers and leisure travels alike, due to its rich cultural history and convenient location in Silicon Valley.
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Several airlines across the world fly to/from SJC, including Alaska Airlines, Air China, Fiji Airways, Aeromexico, Al Nippon, American Airlines, United, Delta, JetBlue, Southwest, and more. With all of these domestic and international airlines flying in and out every single day, it’s not difficult to obtain affordable airfare. The most popular flights to San Jose are on Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, and Aeromexico.
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You can usually find some of the cheapest flights from nearby cities like Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and Long Beach. However, cheap flights to San Jose can still be found in other cities across the country – namely Chicago and Denver. Don’t just look for deals offered by the larger airlines, as Spirit, JetBlue, and Frontier offer airfare at really low prices. Although it’s almost always better to book early, if you’re almost out of time and need to be in the Silicon Valley area soon, Southwest is a good choice of an airline for last minute direct flights to San Jose.
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Regardless of when you need to go and from which city you plan to depart, it’s best to use a travel website that will allow you to search across a large number of airlines and deals to find cheap flights to San Jose.

Adding a Hotel to Cheap Flights to San Jose

Need a hotel? Some of these travel sites will offer you the option to book your hotel in addition the flight. When combining the two expenses together, there are usually huge discounts involved. Whether you’re only planning to stay for a few days or an entire week, it will likely be cheaper to combine airfare with lodging rather than pay for the two separately.
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When should you go? The best time to travel to Northern California is from June to September, when the temperatures are warm during the day, but not blistering hot, and cooler at night. It’s also the time of year when the Jazz Festival is held, which is filled with entertainment and delicious cuisines.
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There is no shortage of attractions in the Silicon Valley, from Alum Rock Park to the Repertory Theater. You will be able to enjoy more activities from the money you save on cheap flights to San Jose.
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Did you know that when going online, you can search over 400 airlines and 320,000+ hotels to find the best travel deals? Using the search tools is the easiest way to find cheap flights to San Jose as well as a hotel room, car rental, dining discounts, and more.

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The History of Austrian Airlines at JFK

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1. Return to JFK:

Two decades after Austrian Airlines launched its original, but unsuccessful transatlantic service to New York–a joint operation with Sabena Belgian World Airways inaugurated on April 1, 1969 with a Boeing 707-320 registered OE-LBA that made an intermediate stop in Brussels-it returned to the US on March 26, 1989, this time with an Airbus A-310-300 sporting registration OE-LAA. The occasion not only introduced intercontinental service to its route system, but a widebody aircraft with its first three-class cabin configuration to its fleet. Unlike the previous attempt, this one proved successful, but signaled the beginning of another two decades of elasticity, paved with numerous aircraft types, airline alliances and strategies, terminals, handling companies, and computer systems. This is its story.

2. JFK Station Evolution:

Initial training, held at Austrian Airlines’ North American headquarters in Whitestone, New York, and taught by Peter “Luigi” Huebner, commenced on February 6, 1989, or six weeks before the inaugural flight, and its curriculum included “Passenger Handling I” and “Adios Check-In” courses.

Austrian Airlines’ first JFK location, the East Wing of the no-longer-existent International Arrivals Building, was a shared facility with Icelandair and encompassed five Austrian-specific check-in counters equipped with computers, automated boarding pass printers, and laser-scannable baggage tag printers, and the jointly-used, upper level Icelandair Saga Lounge.

Entirely employed and trained by Austrian and outfitted in its uniform, its staff performed all ground operations functions: Passenger Service, Ticket Sales-Reservations, Lost-and-Found, Load Control, Administration, Supervision, and Management, while Icelandair personnel served on the ramp, overseeing aircraft servicing and baggage, cargo, and mail loading.

However, the success of the operation relied upon the equipment that serviced it and it was only Airbus Industrie’s decision to offer a shorter-fuselage, lower-capacity version of its signature A-300 that made the reinstated transatlantic operation possible with the A-310.

This long-range, twin-engine, widebody design, of concurrent technology, offered the same range and dual-aisle comfort as the comparable quad-engine 747 or the tri-engine DC-10 and L-1011, yet at the same time offered reduced capacity to facilitate profitable, year-round operations. Because of Austrian’s market size, the larger 747, DC-10, or L-1011 would otherwise have operated at a loss outside of the peak summer travel season. Any of the other then long-range aircraft, inclusive of the Boeing 707 and the McDonnell-Douglas DC-8, featured older-generation, fuel-thirsty, four-engine Stage 1 technology of the early-1960s and would have been banned from US service unless they had been hush-kited or altogether engine-retrofitted. The very A-310 made Austrian Airlines’ long, thin Vienna-New York route sector possible.

The initial 1989 timetable offered six weekly frequencies during the summer and five in the winter, at which time two A-310-300s served New York and Tokyo, the latter with an intermediate stop in Moscow. Alternatively, they also augmented the longer-range routes, such as those to Tel Aviv, Istanbul, and Teheran.

During the first six months of JFK operations, an aircraft never experienced an excessive delay because of scheduling, resulting in exemplary on-time performance.

In-flight service naturally represented a large portion of an airline’s expenditure. As a result, many carriers began to reduce this in order to decrease costs. Austrian Airlines, however, remained unique in a world aloft characterized by snacks and paper cups by providing printed menus, amenity kits, china service, complimentary alcoholic beverages, and earphones in the coach cabins of its transatlantic flights to and from Vienna.

Because of the A-310’s short fuselage, however, lower-deck cargo space was limited, with the forward hold usually accommodating baggage unit load devices (ULDs) and the aft the cargo itself, which was often restricted to two pallets and a single AKE unit.

Although load factors on the New York-Vienna sector were initially low, they steadily increased until most of the flights were full. Large tour groups constituted an increasing portion of the passenger mix, along with the anticipated connecting passengers, who were able to take advantage of the expanding Vienna hub. It was the ultimate testament to a carrier when a passenger chose to fly with it and make a connection at its home airport as opposed to traveling nonstop with a national carrier.

As a “second attempt” across the Atlantic, Austrian Airline’s intercontinental A-310 service to New York was ultimately successful.

With the acquisition of its third A-310-300, registered OE-LAC, Austrian Airlines contemplated service to a second US gateway by the spring of 1991, such as to Los Angeles, but the A-310-300’s 11-hour flight duration precluded this reality. Although Chicago was alternatively considered, American’s own nonstop Boeing 767-200ER service to Vienna would have resulted in prohibitive competition, since O’Hare was its second-largest hub, leaving Washington-Dulles as the only viable alternative.

For the European continental network, a higher gross weight McDonnell-Douglas MD-83 was ordered for delivery in 1991 and several existing MD-81s were converted to this standard, increasing their range and payload capabilities. Two additional Fokker F.50s were also ordered for domestic and long, thin international routes.

During the five-year period from 1989 to 1994, Austrian Airlines independently operated at JFK, offering as few as four weekly departures during the winter and as many as seven during the summer.

3. Delta Air Lines Code Share:

Changing market conditions prompted a modified strategy at JFK for Austrian. Seeking to align itself with a US domestic carrier in order to obtain feed for its transatlantic flights, for example, it concluded a marketing agreement with Delta Air Lines in 1994, in which it placed its two-letter “OS” code on Delta-operated flights, while Delta itself reciprocally placed its own “DL” designator on Austrian’s services. Two Delta flight attendants, wearing their company’s uniforms, initially also served in the cabins of its A-310s to and from Vienna.

Although the concept’s financial benefit was slow to materialize, the aircraft ultimately achieved high load factors, carrying both Austrian and Delta passengers from some two dozen US cities through New York to Vienna, often with beyond-travel.

In order to reduce ground-handling costs and attain synergistic, inter-carrier benefits, Austrian Airlines relocated its operation to Delta Terminal 1A (later redesignated Terminal 2) on July 1, 1994, retaining only nine of its original 21 staff members. Delta Air Lines, the newly-designated ground-handling carrier, assumed arrivals, lost-and-found, passenger check-in, departure gate, ramp, and baggage room responsibilities, while Austrian itself continued to perform its own ticketing, load control, administration, supervision, and management functions.

1994 also marked the acquisition of two long-range, quad-engine A-340-200s configured for 36 business and 227 economy class passengers and registered OE-LAG and OE-LAH. They periodically served New York throughout the next decade.

Yet another change occurred three years later, between February of 1997 and 1998, when it relocated its check-in counters and operational office to Delta Terminal 3, but otherwise remained in the same marketing alliance.

The year also marked the first time that the transatlantic route to New York had sufficiently matured to support a second departure on selected days during the summer timetable, with this additional flight arriving at 2045 and redeparting at 2205. Usually operated by aircraft OE-LAC, an A-310 with a reduced business, but higher-capacity economy section, it facilitated connections with the midday bank of departures from Vienna.

4. Atlantic Excellence:

Once again yielding to airline deregulation-necessitated realignment and attempting to achieve additional cost-reducing synergies, Austrian Airlines integrated its JFK operations with Sabena Belgian World Airways and Swissair on March 1, 1998, forming the tri-carrier Atlantic Excellence Alliance. Although the employees of all three airlines continued to wear their respective uniforms, they operated from single passenger service and load control offices, utilizing a joint Austrian, Sabena, and Swissair check-in facility, and handled each other’s flights.

During the peak summer season, seven daily departures operated by four airlines were offered, inclusive of two to Vienna with Austrian Airlines, two to Brussels with Delta and Sabena, one to Geneva with Swissair, and two to Zurich, also with Swissair.

Eight functions were performed at the Atlantic Excellence station, including Control, Arrivals, Departures, VIP/Special Services, Ticket Sales-Reservations, Load Control, Ramp Supervision, and Trouble Shooting. Because Swissair was contracted to prepare load sheets for Malev-Hungarian Airlines’ flights to Budapest, the Load Control function itself entailed handling six aircraft types-747-300s, A-340-200/-300s, MD-11s, A-330-200s, 767-200ERs, and A-310-300s-often requiring inter-carrier training courses.

As had singularly occurred with Austrian Airlines, Delta equally concluded reciprocal two-letter code-share agreements with Sabena and Swissair, but now took the former marketing arrangement to full alliance status at Delta’s significantly-maturing JFK flight hub. Delta nevertheless continued to provide ramp and baggage room functions for all three Atlantic Excellence airlines.

In August of that year, Austrian Airlines took delivery of the first of four longer-range, higher-capacity A-330-200s, registered OE-LAM and configured for 30 business and 235 economy class passengers, and the type ultimately replaced the A-310-300 as its intercontinental workhorse. The four aircraft, later operating with a reduced, 24-seat business cabin when the Grand Class concept was introduced, sported registrations OE-LAM, OE-LAN, OE-LAO, and OE-LAP.

During the summer timetable of 1998, Austrian fielded its first dual-aircraft type operation from JFK, with the first departure standardly operated by the A-330 and the second by the A-310.

5. Star Alliance:

Although an ultimate “Swissport Solution,” under which all Atlantic Excellence ground operations staff would have been transferred to the service provider, was envisioned, the eventuality never occurred.

Rumors, rumbling through the station like the gentle forewarnings of a pending storm, pervaded the atmosphere by mid-1999. A new strategy seemed to loom on the horizon and its seeds, planted long before it bloomed, were multi-faceted and omni-encompassing.

In June of 1999, Delta Air Lines and Air France had formed the fundamental basis of a new global alliance, which was later named SkyTeam, thus dissolving the 25-month Austrian/Delta/Sabena/Swissair Atlantic Excellence Alliance whose agreement, without renegotiation, would have expired in August of 2000.

Despite a ten-percent investment limitation, Swissair had nevertheless attempted to purchase additional Austrian Airlines stock, precluding Austrian’s goal of retaining its own identity and independence, and forcing it to withdraw from the Swissair-led Qualiflyer Alliance of European carriers.

Swissair and Sabena formed a combined commercial management structure, which again proved counter to Austrian Airlines’ independent direction.

Finally, in early 2000, both Sabena and Swissair concluded code-share agreements with American Airlines, a US airline-alignment that was counter to Austrian Airlines’ strategy of US feed.

As a small, but profitable international carrier of considerable quality, Austrian Airlines nevertheless needed the reach of a global alliance to remain profitable and thus concluded a membership agreement with the Lufthansa- and United-led Star Alliance, which became effective on March 26, 2000.

The largest and longest-running alliance, it was then comprised of Air Canada, Air New Zealand, All Nippon, Ansett Australia, Austrian Airlines, British Midland, Lauda Air, Lufthansa, Mexicana, SAS, Thai Airways International, Tyrolean, United, and Varig, and collectively carried 23-percent of the world’s passenger traffic. But, more importantly, the decision facilitated continued independent identity and operation, yet had the potential for expansion. Expressed as a sentiment, the decision was stated as, “Here we grow again!”

The transition from the Atlantic Excellence to the Star Alliance, commencing as early as January of 2000, entailed four integral changes.

1). An entirely new IT (information technology) system and frequent flier program.

2). The operational relocation to a new terminal, passenger service office, passenger check-in counter, load control-aircraft dispatch center, and gate at JFK.

3) New alliance airline code-share flights and traffic feed resulted in the closing of the Atlanta station and the subsequent opening of the Chicago one and the reopening of the Washington one in the US.

4). The company-wide migration training in Oberlaa, Austria, location of Austrian Airlines’ head office.

Star Alliance membership, once again entailing a relocation to Terminal One at JFK, prompted another handling carrier change, this time from Delta to Lufthansa, which now performed the Baggage Services and Passenger Check-In functions, while Austrian itself continued to act in the capacities of Arrivals, Ticketing, Load Control, Ramp Supervision, and Management. Under a reciprocal agreement, it also provided these passenger services to Lufthansa for its own Frankfurt departures during non-operational hours. Aircraft loading and baggage room functions were initially performed by Hudson General, which was later renamed GlobeGround North America.

In a further cost-reduction strategy, Austrian Airlines relocated to a smaller, reduced-cost Passenger Service office on the ground floor of Terminal One in September of 2002, at which time the Load Control/Ramp Supervision function was awarded to Lufthansa. No longer serving Lufthansa’s flights, Austrian staff members further dwindled, now to six full-time and two part-time positions, and the daily shift hours decreased from nine to eight.

Austrian’s largest-capacity aircraft, the A-340-300–which accommodated 30 business and 261 economy class passengers–intermittently also provided service to JFK, particularly during the summer 2002 timetable when a late Saturday departure was scheduled. Two such aircraft, registered OE-LAK and OE-LAL, now made up part of the fleet.

6. Swissport USA:

The continual need to reduce costs resulted in yet another handling-company change at JFK on January 1, 2003, when most of the ground services were transferred from Lufthansa to Swissport USA.

In preparation for the change, the Swissport passenger service staff attended the Guide Check-In course in Vienna the previous month, while one Swissport agent, who structured the Baggage Services department, attended the World Tracer Basic course later in the year, in October.

Outfitted in Austrian Airlines uniforms, Swissport staff performed the Arrivals, Lost-and-Found, Passenger Check-In, Departure Gate, Load Control, and Ramp Supervision functions, while Austrian itself continued to assume Ticket Sales, Administration, Supervision, and Management responsibilities.

Load control, which was initially performed in Terminal 4 using the Swissair DCS system, was ultimately transferred to Terminal One and the Lufthansa-WAB system after the Swissport operations personnel completed a computerized load control course in Vienna that March.

7. North American Station Training Program:

Because most of the Swissport agents had little previous airline experience and were consequently unfamiliar with Austrian Airlines’ products and procedures, the author created a local training program by drafting the course descriptions, writing the textbooks, devising the quizzes and exams, teaching the courses themselves, and subsequently issuing the training certificates in order to more adequately prepare them to perform their jobs.

The program, tracing its routes to the Austrian Airlines Passenger Handling Course created in 1989 and the introductory Load Control training material written in 1998, evolved into the full-fledged North American Station Training Program, whose content, updated in accordance with aircraft, system, procedure, and alliance change, included the four integral curriculums of “Initial Passenger Service,” “Ramp Supervision Certification,” “Load Control Licensing,” and “Airline Management.”

Ultimately encompassing 27 Passenger Service, Ramp Supervision, Load Control, Air Cargo, and Airline Station Management procedural and training manuals, two station histories, and 28 curriculums, it resulted in 63 courses having been taught to Austrian Airlines and Austrian Airlines-handling carriers Delta, Lufthansa, Passenger Handling Services/Maca, SAS, Servair, and Swissport at the eight North American stations of Atlanta, Cancun, Chicago, Montreal, New York, Punta Cana, Toronto, and Washington.

The program, which quickly evolved into the equivalent of an “airline university” and was often cited as the reason why Swissport staff were eager to transfer to the Austrian Airlines account, proved instrumental in their career paths, facilitating their promotions or acceptances by other airlines.

8. Boeing and Lauda Air to JFK:

JFK, hitherto exclusively served by Austrian Airlines and its fleet of A-310, A-330, and A-340 Airbus widebody aircraft, received its first regularly scheduled Lauda Air 767 operation during the summer of 2004, a carrier founded by Formula I race car driver Niki Lauda and considered Austrian Airlines’ competitor during the early part of its history. But by the following year its frequency quadrupled and during 2007 it altogether replaced the 17-year Airbus service.

The summer 2004 Lauda 767 flight, which operated as an addition to the daily Austrian frequency during the 11-week period from June 26 to September 5, was scheduled to arrive at 2055 on Saturday evenings and departed some 25 hours later at 2200 on Sunday.

In order to prepare the station for the additional service, local Boeing 767 Passenger Service and Boeing 767 Load Control courses were created and taught to Swissport staff.

Because the Lufthansa technical employees did not hold 767 licenses, its maintenance was contracted to Delta Air Lines, which operated all three -200, -300, and -400 series 767s, and an extensive night stop and security procedure was performed before aircraft push-back to the Terminal One hardstand, at which time security seals were applied to all access doors. Off-loaded galley equipment was washed and prepared for the following evening.

Because of the aircraft’s then 36-passenger Amadeus Class capacity, the late departure was difficult to sell in the business cabin without considerable marketing promotion and fare reduction, while cargo-pallet loading was door-dimensionally restricted to four positions in the forward compartment. The aircraft themselves operated in a combination of Lauda Air and Star Alliance liveries.

During the summer 2005 timetable, from June 14 to September 2, the 767-300 provided up to four additional weekly frequencies, resulting in a total of 11, with the A-330 standardly operating the early departure and the 767-300 the late one.

By 2007, the type altogether replaced the A-330 and A-340 fleets, but appeared with several configurations. Aircraft OE-LAE, -LAY, and -LAZ, for example, accommodated 36 in business and 189 in economy, while those registered OE-LAX and -LAW respectively featured 30 and 200 seats. Aircraft OE-LAT, which offered the highest capacity of the six, included ten more seats than these latter two, for a 240-passenger coach complement.

9. Centralized Load Control:

In late-2006, a concept known as the “Centralized Load Control” (CLC) System was introduced at JFK, and the station, like the nucleus of an atom, became the core of it all.

Brainchild of Michael Steinbuegl, then-JFK Station Manager, the procedure, following trends set by Swiss International in New York, Lufthansa in Cape Town, and SAS in Bangkok, had its origins in an earlier investigative project in which he explored cost reductions by means of a large, single Centralized Load Control department in Vienna or several regional ones. The latter, however, entailed language and time zone obstacles.

Having himself amassed considerable experience creating operational procedures and methods as former Aircraft Handling Manager, he was well versed with weight and balance issues.

Seeking to apply this knowledge and simultaneously attempting to rectify the system incompatibility and communication difficulties encountered with the SAS-Bangkok arrangement in Washington, he tackled this station first, which, like JFK, already used the Lufthansa-WAB system. In the process, he set the course for the many transitions to come by making several duty trips to establish local station-compatible procedures and then drafting a detailed booklet concerning them. The first centralized load sheet for the Washington flight, OS 094, was generated on November 1, 2006.

Charlie Schreiner, then head of Austrian Airlines Load Control, subsequently marked the occasion by sending the following telex.

“With Austrian Airlines Flight OS 094 on November 1,” he wrote, “our first line station had been connected to a regular Centralized Load Control process with ULD aircraft. All activities toward the operational flight preparation, load planning, ULD coordination, and WAB System documentation, inclusive of the load sheet transmitted to the cockpit via ACARs, had been successfully controlled by our JFK station yesterday.”

The remainder of the CLC program, however, involved phased implementation. In May of the following year, service was reinaugurated from Chicago. Because this could now be considered a “new” station, it logically followed that its load sheet would be integrated into the CLC system from the start and, despite computer system differences, was successfully adapted with the first flight on May 29 after procedural modifications.

With these cities being handled by JFK, it was decided to integrate the last North American station, Toronto, whose first centralized load sheet was issued on July 1.

Three Austrian Airlines-dedicated Load Controllers from Swissport, two of whom worked on a given day during the peak summer season, formed the Centralized Load Control System team.

Since the fourth station was integrated, JFK produced some 120 load sheets per month, and the highly successful system yielded numerous benefits.

First and foremost, it produced considerable savings. All flights departed on time relative to their load plan and load sheet preparations and all four North American flights were operationally handled by only one more daily Load Controller than JFK had employed for a single departure. All loading instruction reports and load sheets were additionally generated by the Lufthansa-WAB system, giving Vienna immediate access to all load control-related data and documentation.

10. Boeing 777:

When Austrian Airlines turned the page of its winter 2008-2009 timetable on March 29, JFK fielded its first Boeing 777-200ER operation, the carrier’s largest capacity aircraft and the fifth basic type to have served New York after the A-310, the A-330, the A-340, and the 767.

The airplane, having originally been acquired by Lauda Air, was configured for 49 business class and 258 coach passengers, although two later examples, which featured higher gross weights and modified passenger arrangements, accommodated 260 economy class passengers in ten-abreast, three-four-three, configurations.

During the six-month period between April and September of 2009, the single flight carried 34 percent more arriving and departing passengers, along with significantly increased complements of cargo and mail, than the comparable year-earlier period, when the 767 was used. The four 777s in the fleet were registered OE-LPA, OE-LPB, OE-LPC, and OE-LPD.

11. Lufthansa Acquisition:

2009 was a pivotal year for Austrian Airlines, both locally and systemwide. Because of the global economic downturn, escalating fuel prices, eroding yields, and strong competition within Western Europe from low cost carriers, its financial viability and continued existence as a company were threatened, despite previous strategies that included selling its A-330 and A-340 fleet, reducing its long-range route system, and implementing several restructuring plans. Its savior, in the form of an agreement with Lufthansa-German Airlines, enabled it to continue operating, as it assumed its debt and acquired the majority of its shares.

On August 28, the European Commission officially approved Lufthansa-German Airlines’ acquisition of the Austrian Airlines Group. Comprised of the 500 million euros from the stated holding company needed for restructuring and the merger between the two carriers, the strategy paved the way for Austrian’s integration into the Lufthansa fold by September. In order to achieve the required antitrust immunity, however, Lufthansa itself had to agree to relinquish key flight slots and reduce the number of services between Vienna and Brussels, Cologne, Frankfurt, Munich, and Stuttgart.

For Austrian Airlines, which would become one of Lufthansa’s several independent, European hub carriers, it signaled financial survival, an improved economic foundation, cost synergies, such as joint fuel and aircraft purchasing, and access to Lufthansa’s extensive international sales and route network. The establishment of Vienna as a high-performance hub for traffic feed to its new owner’s dense Central and Eastern European route system was considered Austrian’s strength within the system.

As a result of this ownership, numerous, fundamental North American changes also occurred.

In Toronto and Washington, for example, Lufthansa assumed all ground-handling aspects.

In New York, more than half of the staff employed at its North American headquarters in Whitestone were laid off, while its facility, located on the fifth floor of Octagon Plaza and considered its “fortress” for almost a quarter of a century, was closed, with its remaining employees relocating to Lufthansa’s East Meadow, Long Island, office.

At JFK itself, Austrian Airlines Cargo equally relocated to the Lufthansa facility on November 1, and 16 days later Swissport passed the ground-handling torch to Lufthansa-German Airlines.

Michael Steinbuegl, Manager of that station for four years, was promoted to Key Account Manager, North America, but four Ticket Sales-Reservation positions were rendered redundant when Lufthansa assumed those functions, reducing the Austrian Airlines’ staff to just two members, (the author included), who received limited, six-month contracts that expired on May 15, 2010. Intermittently integrated into the Lufthansa operation and schedule, they handled their flights, while familiarizing Lufthansa employees with their own procedures, but after this transition period, were equally released from employment.

The last Austrian Airlines “red uniform presence,” whether having been represented by purely Austrian Airlines or Swissport staff, occurred on November 15, and the first floor office in Terminal One, hitherto “home” for the carrier’s Management, Passenger Service, Centralized Load Control, Ticket Sales-Reservations, and Baggage Services/Lost and Found Departments, was relinquished for three desks in the Lufthansa facility, two of which were Duty Manager stations located on the main level and one of which was reserved for the Key Account Manager position on the lower level in the Station Operations office.

All things seem to come fully cycle. The event, effectively ending 21 years of autonomous Austrian Airlines presence, marked the carrier’s return to its 1938 integration with Lufthansa and its 2000 ground-handling arrangement at JFK.

12. JFK Station Strengths:

In 2009, Austrian Airlines operated 666 arriving and departing flights at JFK and carried 158,267 in- and outbound passengers, an 18.42-percent increase over the year-earlier figure, while it operated 5,005 arriving and departing flights and carried 1,074,642 passengers during the seven-year period, between 2003 and 2009, that Swissport USA assumed its ground-handling there.

JFK, having weathered several airline alliances, terminal locations, computer systems, handling companies, aircraft types, and an ever-decreasing number of Austrian Airlines personnel over its 21-year presence, effectively closed its doors, the last of its North American stations to have done so.

Throughout its more than two-decade presence, it had handled five aircraft types–the Airbus A-310, the Airbus A-330, the Airbus A-340, the Boeing 767, and the Boeing 777; had assumed four strategies–its initial, independent operation; the Delta Air Lines code share agreement; the tri-carrier Atlantic Excellence station; and the Star Alliance integration; had operated from four JFK terminals–Terminal One, Terminal Two, Terminal Three, and the International Arrivals Building; had been handled by three companies–Delta Air Lines, Lufthansa-German Airlines, and Swissport USA; and had used two computer systems.

Because the talents and abilities of many of its staff were channeled to produce creative and innovative results during the last chapter of its existence, JFK had notched up several achievements, some of which enabled it to play an increasingly nucleic role within North America. They can be subdivided as follows.

The North American Station Training Program, comprised of the Passenger Service, Ramp Supervision Certification, Load Control Licensing, and Management disciplines, was instrumental in the educational preparation of all entry-level employees, enabling them to perform their designated functions with sufficient procedural knowledge or climb the ladder all the way to management, if so needed. The textbooks and courses were subsequently used to duplicate this success at Austrian Airlines’ other North American stations.

The Centralized Load Control (CLC) Department, entailing the preparation of loading instruction/reports and load sheets for the four North American stations of Chicago, New York, Toronto, and Washington, was highly successful and once involved four aircraft types: the Boeing 767, the Airbus A-330, the Airbus A-340, and the Boeing 777.

The Baggage Services/Lost and Found Department, under the direction of Omar Alli, served as a model for other stations and earned a lost baggage rating that became the envy of them. Omar himself often traveled to other stations in order to provide restructuring guidance for their own Baggage Services Departments.

The Ticket Sales-Reservations counter, under the direction of Sidonie Shields, consistently collected significant amounts of annual revenue in ticket sales, excess baggage, and other fees.

The visible presence of Austrian Airlines, in red uniforms, to the passenger, whether worn by Austrian Airlines or Swissport staff, cemented its identity.

The several annual special flights, which sometimes posed significant challenges, but were always successfully executed, included those carrying the Rabbi Twersky group, the American Music Abroad group, the IMTX group, the Vienna Boys’ Choir, the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, and Life Ball, the latter with its high-profile celebrities, colorful characters, and pre-departure parties.

The special events, often fostering a “family” atmosphere among its own and Swissport staff, included the annual “Year in Review” series, the Pocono Mountain ski trips, the summer pool parties, the birthdays, the Thanksgiving dinners, and the Secret Santas at Christmas.

And, finally, the daily briefings, jokes, laughs, raps, camaraderie, friendships, and human connections continually emphasized and acknowledged the true souls behind everyone as they cohesively worked toward the airline’s and the station’s common goals.

Michael Steinbuegl, who assumed command as JFK Station Manager in September of 2005, had cultivated the environment and orchestrated the steps that had allowed every one of these accomplishments to be made.

13. Two Decades of Elasticity:

Austrian Airlines, hitherto among the smallest European airlines, had to assume a considerable degree of necessary “elasticity” during its 21 years at JFK, ebbing and flowing with the ever-changing turbulence created by prevailing market conditions, seeking financial benefit, synergistic strength, market niche, alliance realignment, and ultimate change of ownership. Defying Darwinian philosophy, whose “survival of the fittest” prediction is often translated as “survival of the largest,” Austrian Airlines had, despite numerous, necessary redirections, proven the contrary, perhaps prompting a rewording of the philosophy to read, “survival of the smallest,” if four short words were added-namely, “as a global player.”

Toward this end, the latest strategy enabled the carrier to survive. For station JFK and its staff, however, it did not.

Epilogue:

Because I had been hired by Austrian Airlines two months before its inaugural transatlantic flight from JFK occurred on March 26, 1989 and subsequently held several positions there throughout its 21-year history, I felt singularly qualified, as a lifetime aviation researcher, historian, and writer, to preserve its story in words. It is, in essence, my story. It is what I lived. And what I leave…

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What Is The Best Day Of The Week To Book A Flight To Fiji From The US?

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Are you looking for flights to Fiji From LAX (Los Angeles International Airport)? There are couple of details you should know before booking your flight. After finding a great flight, make sure to explore our Fiji guide and resorts so you can travel to Fiji like a pro. Unless you reside near the L.A. Area, you will need to include a connecting flight from your local airport. If this is the case, make sure you have plenty of time to make your connecting flight.

Departure Days & Airlines

Air Pacifc (Fiji Airways) is Fiji’s national airline company. They provide both business and economy seating. Flights depart from LAX on Saturday, Sunday, Tuesday, and Thursday. A Friday, Monday, and Tuesday option is often available with a stop in Honolulu. You will certainly receive the “Bula” welcome while in flight with Air Pacific!

Air New Zealand is another fantastic option to book to Fiji. They provide additional economy comfort when you upgrade to economy skycoach. Terrific for those who want additional space or are traveling with children. Air New Zealand’s departure schedule from LAX to Nadi International Airport Fiji (NAN) is daily. If you are searching for a flight on a Friday, Monday, or Tuesday you should have good luck when flying with Air New Zealand.

American Airlines flight itineraries to Nadi fluctuate, but Saturday, Sunday, Tuesday, and Thursday are the best days to start your search. American Airlines’ goal for its travelers is to bring a new level of comfort, connectivity and convenience.

Qantas also departs from Los Angeles on Saturday, Sunday, Tuesday, and Thursday. Qantas is Australia’s largest domestic and international airline. They have a reputation for exceptional customer support.

Flight Duration

A flight from LAX to NAN (Nadi International Airport Fiji) is about 11 hours and 5 minutes non-stop. Connecting flights can range from 16 to 24+ hours before arriving. You will lose about two days because of the time zone difference. For example if you leave for Fiji on the 1st of July, you will land in Fiji on the 3rd of July, during the 11-16 hour flight. Most flights from LAX depart at night and land early morning in Fiji.

Frequent Flier Miles

When traveling from LAX to NAN, you can anticipate to rack up around 5,500 frequent flier miles one way.

Book A Flight

Now that you know the departure days and airline options, you can now find flights effortlessly. Have a safe trip to Fiji!

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America’s Pride – Delta Airlines and Sun Country Airlines

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Traveling on cheap Delta Airlines flights has become easier than ever before, and traveling via Delta Airlines has become something of a prestige in recent years. Perhaps this has to do with Delta’s illustrious history and its tradition of providing excellent service and comfort to its passengers. Originally founded as a crop-dusting operation, it began passenger service in 1929 under its present name. Since then, it has expanded its services to various destinations, both domestic and international. At present, it serves 319 destinations and it has found for itself a niche in the airline industry that flies over the American skies.

With Delta Airlines reservations, you can be assured of expecting the best from your in-flight experience regardless of where your destination lies. In-flight Wi-Fi connectivity enables you to be connected with family and business associates while you recline comfortably on the high-quality seats specifically designed to provide the ultimate relaxing experience you can hope for. Power outlets are available to charge your electronic devices; in-flight entertainment contains a great selection of movies, TV programs, music and games that would certainly prevent boredom from creeping in. The in-flight meal service and complimentary beverages are sure to tantalize your taste buds and to ensure a gastronomic extravaganza!

On the other hand, if you get your hands on Sun Country travel deals then you would be glad to know about the airline’s history of near collapse and eventual recovery, literally, coming back with a bang. Founded in 1982, Sun Country’s original mandate had been ferrying residents of Minnesota state to warmer destinations (such as Dallas and Miami) in the winter months. Steady growth enabled Sun Country to serve more than 40 destinations throughout the United States, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. Surviving bankruptcy in the 2000s, today Sun Country is one of the most profitable carriers in the States.

When you make Sun Country Airlines reservations you can avail their affordable first class service that allows you to travel with ease and comfort, allowing you to sit back and enjoy the flight with extra leg room and plush seats that enables you to be at ease during the duration of your flight. In-flight entertainment allows you to be absorbed into a large collection of movies, TV programs and music tracks. And as if that was not enough, you can get to eat the best in-flight means and complimentary alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages.

Therefore, what airline you choose for your next trip purely depends on what kind of in-flight experience you would prefer. In any case, both carriers offer exciting last minute flight deals for all of its destinations. So what are you waiting for? Pack your bags and check out the amazing deals and make your next holiday plan a reality by traveling in ease, comfort and get the most out of your light by flying on these two exemplary airline services that continue to serve passengers and carry them to their destinations, be they domestic or international metropolitan cities.

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The History of Delta Air Lines and Its TriStar Fleet

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As the oldest existing passenger airline, Delta itself traces its roots to 1925, when, in initial form, it operated crop dusting services as Huff Daland Dusters with the Petrel 31. Nicknamed the “Puffer,” it was the first agricultural airplane specifically designed to protect the cotton fields of the southern United States against the boll weevil.

Independence and a Delta Air Service name three years later placed the fledgling concern on the threshold of gradual growth.

A meager, four-destination route network enabled it to serve Dallas, Shreveport, Monroe, and Jackson as of June 17, 1929.

Shedding its farm image a decade later, it acquired Lockheed L-10A Electra and Douglas DC-3 cabin airliners, facilitating service after a route award to Savannah, Knoxville, and Cincinnati, and from Chicago to Miami in 1946, albeit via these cities with an additional touchdown in Charleston.

Even larger, faster, and more advanced quad-engine piston liners improved its image, the Douglas DC-4 replacing the DC-3 on the Midwest-Florida run, the DC-6 replacing the DC-4 in December of 1948, and the DC-7 replacing it on April 1, 1954.

Its coverage significantly increased four years later, on May 1, when it merged with Chicago and Southern.

Delta entered the jet age on September 18, 1959 with the Douglas DC-8-10 and this was followed less than a year later with the Convair CV-880 on short- to medium-range sectors. Despite the speed advantage achieved with its Rolls Royce Conway engines, it was both ear-shattering and fuel-thirsty.

A southern route authority, granted in 1962, elevated Delta to transcontinental carrier status, enabling it to operate from Dallas to Los Angeles and San Francisco. Other service expansions included those from Atlanta to Jacksonville and Orlando and those to Phoenix and Las Vegas. Like Eastern, however, it remained a primarily East Coast airline.

Too large and offering more range than necessary, the DC-8 and CV-880 were replaced by the Douglas DC-9 twin-jet in 1965 on short-range, low-capacity US domestic sectors.

The carrier’s widebody era dawned at the beginning of the next decade with the Boeing 747-100 in 1970, the McDonnell-Douglas DC-10-10 two years later to provide needed capacity during the Lockheed L-1011 delivery delays, and the TriStar itself.

Acquiring Northeast Airlines on August 1, 1972 to obtain its much-demanded sun routes, it acquired Boeing 727-100 tri-jets and was able to inaugurate service from Montreal and Boston to Miami and count Bermuda and Nassau and Freeport in the Bahamas in its network.

Operating from an Atlanta hub, with secondary traffic centers in Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Fort Lauderdale, Memphis, New Orleans, New York, and Tampa a decade later, Delta had expanded into the third-largest carrier, transporting 34.7 million passengers in 1979 and operating 1,300 daily flights to 80 destinations in the US, Canada, Bermuda, the Bahamas, Puerto Rico, the United Kingdom, and West Germany. Its slogan, appropriately, was “Delta is ready when you are.”

Its growth, accelerated with purchases of Pan Am’s European routes and Western Airlines, became exponential. As evidenced by the voluminous, 433-page July 1, 1988 edition of its system timetable, it operated more than 2,200 departures with some 380 aircraft to 156 destinations in 42 US states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, and 11 foreign countries, including Canada, Bermuda, the Bahamas, Mexico, Ireland, Great Britain, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan, principally from its Atlanta, Cincinnati, Dallas, Los Angeles, and Salt Lake City hubs.

A considerably mixed Boeing, Lockheed, and McDonnell-Douglas fleet encompassed 727-200s (12 first class and 136 coach passengers), DC-9-30s (12F and 86Y), 737-200s (either 12F and 95Y or 8F and 107Y), DC-10-10s (36F and 248Y), L-1011-1s, -250s, and -500s (which featured several configurations, including 32F and 270Y, 12F, 54C, and 203Y, 12F, 40C, and 189Y, and 18F, 64C, and 140Y), MD-88s (14F and 128Y), 737-300s (8F and 120Y), 757-200s (16F and 171Y), 767-200s (18F and 186Y), 767-300s (24F and 230Y), and DC-8-71s (18F and 194Y).

Whereas the emphasis had once been on fleet standardization and a minimum number of aircraft types to reduce crew training, maintenance, and spare parts inventories, the then-emerging megacarriers, such as Delta, which, by definition, served every route length and density, from the 100-mile feeder sector to the transcontinental and intercontinental high-capacity journey, necessitated a broad range of types and versions, since one integrated airline effectively had to do the job of many: commuter, large regional, US national, major, and megacarrier.

As a result, four large US regionals, operating as the Delta Connection, collectively offered 3,900 daily departures to 240 cities over and above Delta mainline flights and included Atlantic Southeast Airlines with DHC-7s, SD3-60s, EMB-120s, and EMB-110s, Business Express with F.27s, SD3-60s, S-340s, and B1900s), Comair with S-340s, Fairchild Swearingen Metros, and EMB-110s, and Skywest with EMB-120s and Swearingen Metros as this time.

Having been the world’s largest TriStar operator, with three versions and two sub-variants, Delta, considering it the “queen of the fleet,” placed its initial order for 24 L-1011-s in 1968 to supplement its existing DC-8s, yet offer increased, widebody comfort and quieter, more fuel efficient high bypass ratio turbofans, once advertising, “The magnificent $18 million TriStar, newest member of the Delta Air Lines wide-ride fleet.” It left most of its other US carrier competitors, including American, Continental, National, Northwest, United, and Western, to order the competing DC-10-10.

Forced to intermittently operate five of the McDonnell-Douglas counter parts because of the Rolls Royce bankruptcy program cessation, it ultimately sold them to United, although they were leased back between 1972 and 1975. It also deployed 747-100s on its transcontinental routes prior to that. Their capacity, in the event, eclipsed demand.

Its first L-1011-1, registered N701DA, was configured for 50 first and 200 coach passengers. But it was just the beginning of a history with a type that would prove synonymous with the Atlanta-based carrier, with 40 more acquired between 1973 and 1983.

Because its route system predominantly consisted of short- to medium-range sectors, it was airborne for about two hours at a time, connecting cities less than 1,000 miles apart.

Exceeding the range of its first transatlantic route award, from Atlanta to London-Gatwick, it was supplemented by two L-1011-100s leased from TWA, and these were eventually also deployed to Frankfurt and Tokyo.

In 1980, it took delivery of three truly intercontinental L-1011-500s.

A second-hand TriStar acquisition program proved extensive. Fourteen L-1011-500s (six from Air Canada, three from Pan Am, and five from United) were purchased between 1984 and 1992 and ten L-1011-1s were acquired from Eastern between 1991 and 1992.

Aside from leasing two L-1011-200s powered by RB.211-524B engines, it modified one L-1011-1 to -200 standard and the remaining six to -250 configurations, enabling each to operate longer-range sectors.

Instrumental in serving the European transatlantic routes it acquired from Pan Am, with up to 80 daily flights in the summer of 1992, the type, in its -500 guise, regularly made the 5,074-mile Anchorage-Hong Kong trans-Pacific crossing, its longest.

Although budgetary constraints precluded Lockheed from offering what could have been the definitive replacement in the form of the stretched L-1011-400, the type continued to ply Delta’s route system until only about 30 daily flights counted for TriStar service by the end of 2000, progressive replacements having taken form as the Boeing 767-200, -300, and -400 and the MD-11, perhaps McDonnell-Douglas’s ultimate triumph over Lockheed.

First delivered in November of 1979, aircraft N728DA, an L-1011-1, operated Delta’s last scheduled flight, from Atlanta to Orlando and return, on July 31, 2001, receiving a double water cannon salute after touchdown on Georgia soil. It had flown almost 31,000 flight cycles, 66,000 hours, and more than 27 million miles during its career.

The 70 TriStars of all versions that Delta had eventually operated during more than a quarter of a century represented 30 percent of Lockheed’s total production run.

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Domestic, International Airline Flights to Mumbai

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The financial and economical capital of India, Mumbai has a wide array of diversities to offer. Holding the business and entertainment hub in its group of seven islands, this city has become the central attraction to almost anyone interested in knowing this city better.

With its growing popularity and its insteps into the financial world, Mumbai, among others, offers a wide combination of transportation. From the ever running local trains to the flights taking off and landing at every hour, Mumbai has converted into an ever happening and sleepless city.

Mumbai holds two important and equally popular airports for domestic and international purposes- the Santacruz Domestic Airport and the Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport. The Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport is famed for being the busiest airport in South Asia when talking about the passenger inflow. This airport breathes life into the city making it connected to the rest of the world. The flights operating under this airport covers almost all important cities in the world from Tokyo, Bangkok, Cairo, Dubai, Colombo, Kuala Lumpur, Paris, London, Bahrain, Karachi, Johannesburg and Zurich among others.

Flights to Mumbai operate under all-important hours with good service offered to the passengers. This airport benefits Mumbai by bringing the traveling crowd from the Western parts of the world. The flights to Mumbai include famed British Airways, the US Airways, Qatar Airways, Virgin Atlantic and the Air France among others. Because of these coveted airlines following their routes to Mumbai, this city has been able to garner the best deals to itself and for the country.

On the domestic front, the Santacruz Domestic Airport plays a magnificent role in this city’s frontier. This airport is catered with many flights to Mumbai, from all of India. Important domestic flights such as Spice Jet, Kingfisher Airlines, and Jet Airways all fly over this city giving its importance. The Santa Cruz Domestic Airport covers other important cities like Delhi, Bangalore, Ahemdabad, Chennai, Kolkata, and Hyderabad among others.

Spice Jet is famed for its lowest domestic fares among all other airlines and it covers many cities and small towns with Mumbai. Kingfisher Airlines, also popular for low airfares, has flights to Mumbai running on a daily basis making the air traffic more flexible and comfortable. All of these airlines offer top class service making the trip to Mumbai a reminiscent one.

Considering the important of air transport in the economy of a country and to a city, the airlines industry has taken great care on covering all the important aspects under air traveling. Booking air ticket is just one among them, which have been given importance to ease down the hassles related to air traveling. All tickets can be booked and checked online which offers comfort and saves time. The ticket availability and the cancellation process can all be done online.

Flights to Mumbai cover all-important personal services from good passenger service to great discounts on the air tickets bringing traveling to Mumbai, a great experience whether it is a holiday trip or a business meet.

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Factors That Affect the Price of an Airline Ticket

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The wide range of prices encountered when shopping for an airline ticket, make this a daunting task. What factors affect the price?

  • Fuel cost has one of the greatest influences on tickets. As the price of crude rises, so do the airline’s costs. Airlines that negotiate fuel purchases well into the future can avoid sudden spikes, and pass on savings to the customer.
  • A weak economy causes people to cut back on non-essential travel. This encourages airlines to give discounts to lure fliers back. Conversely, when business is good, and planes are filled to capacity, there is little incentive to offer low price airline tickets.
  • Airport fees are another part of ticket prices. Airlines using smaller airports save on fees.
  • Destination is a factor. Competition will greatly affect price. An airline that enjoys a virtual monopoly for a particular route can charge pretty much what they want. Those flying international routes have stiff competition from other countries, and have to keep prices in line with what they are offering.
  • Budget airlines can sometimes provide the cheapest airline tickets through a “no-frills” approach. This is most effective on short-haul domestic flights.
  • Timing plays a role. If departure time is nearing, and a flight still has a lot of empty seats, the airline may offer them at a substantial reduction. If flying on a particular day isn’t critical, it may worth holding out until the last minute.
  • Where the ticket is purchased can affect its cost. Travel agents get bargains from the carriers, but charge for their services. The internet produces some bargains, but be careful who you are dealing with. Occasionally the airlines’ own websites have unadvertised discounts.
  • Plain, old-fashioned greed. Air travel is a market driven economy, and airlines will charge as much as they can get away with. Don’t believe anyone. Do your own research.

When shopping for cheap flights, be aware of what you are actually comparing. One airline advertises a flight to an Asian destination, as $800, while another gives a price of $1300. Reading the fine print shows that the “cheap fare” has another $700 in hidden fees and surcharges, meaning it is actually $200 more than the all-inclusive fare.

There are many factors which affect the cost of an airline ticket. How well the carrier manages these costs will determine their bottom line. Competition is the key, airlines that most want your business will offer the best deals. Careful shopping will help find the cheapest flights.

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Delta Airlines – A Simple Way of Flying

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Delta Airlines operates more than 1500 flights per day for which about 70000 people are employed in various capacities. Employees of the airline enjoy many facilities including free global travel after 30 days of employment; medical, dental and vision coverage; paid vacations; life insurance; holidays and profit sharing. Delta's partner airlines include – Air France, AeroMexico, Alitalia, AirEuropa and Aeroflot. The airline's employees also get domestic partner programs.

Delta Airlines fleet consists of different types and flight models. The airline has Boeing, and numerous airbus aircraft. Some of them were acquired after its merger with Northwest Airlines in 2008. The airline has the largest fleets of Boeing 757 and Boeing 767 and it is also the largest operator of Airbus A330 aircraft in America. Different types of aircraft in Delta's fleet are – Airbus A319-100, Boeing 757-200, McDonnell Douglas DC-9-40, McDonnell Douglas MD-88, McDonnell Douglas MD-90, Boeing 767-300ER etc.

You can check the status of a Delta Airline's flight in which you or a loved one is traveling. Though more than 75% percent Delta's flights are on time, sometimes it can be delayed due to bad weather conditions and heavy air traffic. To track the status of a flight, log on to Delta's official website. In the sections provided enter the flight number or airport code of the flight you want to track. You can also call up the airline's flight information phone to know the status.

Delta Airline allows passengers to travel with their pets in their cabin with the owners, under certain restrictions. The pet must be kept in a kennel which can fit under the seat in your front. Passengers can check with the reservation department to find out the exact size of the kennel. The pet must be kept inside the kennel with the door closed in the aircraft as well as the lounge and boarding areas. Only one pet per passenger is allowed in the aircraft. To know other rules about carrying pets onboard, get in touch with the airlines.

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KLM Airlines Vs Eva Airlines – The Facilities and Services

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When you travel, there are a few things you will always think of. The stay and the mode of transport, these are the two main things. If the place is far and you have to reach quickly then the air plane is the best option. Moreover, people prefer domestic and international travel by air travel only. This is because it has become much cheaper than before. There are so many airlines that give you the best facilities and services. So, sometimes it becomes quite confusing for you to think as to what will actually work for you.

When you have to compare Eva Airlines and KLM Airlines, it’s tough to choose, because they both are good in their own ways. They have virtues like good staff, good service and affordable flights. But they both have their own terms and conditions of travel and so it’s vital that you make the right choice after you study about the airlines. You can opt for an Eva air online reservation or KLM airlines air ticket booking, the choice is yours.

Eva airlines belong to Taiwan and it has passenger as well as cargo services. Even though the company is owned privately, there are many flights that have international route. This is the 5 star airlines and has been given many awards till date. The passenger and cargo services are allowed to more than 40 destinations and the leading ones are Asia, Europe and North America. In the year 2015, there were 74 air crafts as the fleet size. The check in is pretty simple and there is help staff that would help the travelers. Also, on board facilities are amazing. Inside the flight there is good music system, kids play area, seat back screens, personal headsets and so on. There are a lot of magazines and news papers that you will find on the air craft making your trip pretty special and relaxed. Booking an Eva air flight can make your task pretty easy.

On the other hand KLM, the Netherland’s Airline is equally good and popular. It has a good reputation because of its work and of its age. It is quite old and was established in the year 1919. There are around 130 destinations that this airline serves. There are amazing facilities that this airline provides on the flights and this would include music, TV programs, cinema, games, and good food and so on.

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Do Your Trip With American Airlines

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Setting The Stage

Let’s set the stage for your trip with American Airlines. You are just recently entering the job world and your new boss wants you to schedule a meeting with one of your clients to discuss them buying into a new product that your company just introduced that they think would really help your clients be more efficient.

Bullet List For Preview

Now there are a lot of things that you have to do in this situation so let’s just give a bullet list of them:

Set a date and time that the meeting will be held.

Scheduling a time that you would like to be arriving into the area that your client is at.

Buying a ticket and getting everything set up correctly so you don’t have any problems at the airport.

Packing your baggage in a manner that will be most constructive and beneficial to you.

Getting to the airport and actually flying to your client.

Doing great at the meeting with your clients and getting that successful transaction for your client and you.

And finally flying back to your home.

Setting A Date And Time With Client

Now with all these variables it is always best to stop at the top of the list because it is easier to complete. Setting a date and time with your client is crucial for an actual meeting to happen so you can actually have something to fly to and be there for. Where as if you just showed up that might be just a little weird for you and your client because they have no idea what you are showing up there for. So set a date and time that is good for your client and good for you as well.

Schedule Your Arrival Time

The second thing that you want to do is to schedule a time that you would like to be there so you feel comfortable and prepared for your meeting. Let’s just say that your client doesn’t have much free time so they would like to have the meeting at 8’o clock in the morning. So once you look and you thought there was a flight from ORD, Chicago, to BOS, Boston, that would leave ORD and get you to BOS before 8am, but unfortunately there is no such flight in your case. But in your luck there is a flight that leaves the night before at 6pm from ORD and gets you into BOS at 10pm. You feel good because that flight will get you there the night before and you can have some time to relax and make sure everything is working and correct for your meeting the next day. So you decide to take that flight and thus begins the next step in ticketing and reserving your flight to BOS.

Buy Those Tickets

Now that you are in the step of ticketing and reserving your seats roundtrip to and from BOS one thing that you want to make sure that you do is to correctly put in your information so you do not have any problems in the airport when you get there. The best way to do this is to use the put in the exact same information that is on your drivers license or passport, whichever you want to fly with is perfect for domestic travel, because this is what they will use at security and in the check in process at the airport. If your name is misspelled there might be a problem and will incur you spending more of your time getting stressed about something that you could have just easily done when you were booking the flight. Now that you successfully booked your flights on aa.com, American Airlines, you are ready to get packing your bags and ready to fly out for that important meeting.

Pack That Bag

Since you are ready to pack your bags and get this show on the road one thing that is best to do is to correctly pack on what you would like to bring with you on your trip. There is always a lot that you think you should bring with you so in order to complete know what you should bring with you is to initially take out everything that you think you could possibly need, then reduce the things that you wouldn’t really need because you don’t want to take too much with you if it is going to be a short trip with only one or two meetings. You are not packing to travel the world for a year long journey.

Petal To The Metal To The Airport

Now that you have efficiently and effectively packed your bag for your trip to your meeting with your client you now need to get to the airport to actually fly to your meeting. Now a lot of people do really well until they get to this step and this is the point where they break down and start the meltdown of what is going to happen on the plane, the nervousness of missing a flight, and every other fear that you could imagine. The best thing to plan for traveling with American Airlines is to go online the night before your flight and just simply check in to your flight. Once you do this it will usually allow you to get your seats and boarding pass. One other thing that might make your life a little bit easier is to print these boarding passes or to download the American Airlines app and get the boarding passes on your phone. This will allow for relaxation knowing that you don’t have to go to a busy counter or agent to get boarding passes, unless you have a checked bag. Now the next best thing to do is to usually show up about 1.5hr-2hr before your flight if it is at a big airport or 1hr at a small airport. This will allow enough time to go through security, get to the gate, go to the restroom, and any other needs you would need to address before you get on the plane.

If you have done all these steps you sure most likely to have a high success rate of getting to your gate with as little stress as possible. You will surely be on the road to success and you will get to your meeting and win those clients over with the new product that you want them to buy. You got this!

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